• Threatened Species & Ecological Communities
  • Threatened Species & Ecological Communities

    Find out more about how Terrain NRM is working with partners to protect and recover some of the Wet Tropics threatened species and ecological communities.

   

In the Wet Tropics region of North Queensland, there are almost 50 threatened animal species, more than 200 threatened plant species and three threatened ecological communities.

As a Natural Resource Management body, one of Terrain's roles is to work in partnership with the community, industry and government to help recover Wet Tropics plants, animals and habitats at risk of extinction. 

Terrain's current focus is on recovery and protection of the  cassowary , mahogany glider and Mabi Forest .

Federal and state government roles

There are a number of pieces of legislation in place to protect threatened species in Australia:

Terrain’s role

Across Australia, regional NRM bodies such as Terrain work to improve the condition, extent and connectivity of threatened species habitats across the landscape, whether its on public or private property.

Terrain's work with threatened species involves helping to:

  • raise community awareness about threats and solutions to threatened species
  • share threatened species knowledge and experience between community groups, researchers and government
  • provide technical advice about threatened species to recovery teams and community groups
  • prepare, implement and review recovery plans and action plans for threatened species
  • secure investment to implement actions in recovery plans
  • improve mapping of threatened species habitat and corridors
  • identify and address traditional owners values and sites within threatened species habitat and facilitate traditional owner involvement in threatened species planning and management
  • assist public and private land managers of threatened species habitat with practical tools, guidelines and technical advice for planning and management
  • incorporate threatened species into government planning processes
  • align fire, pest and weed management plans with threatened species recovery plans
  • encourage actions that benefit multiple threatened species, e.g. restoring wildlife corridors that connect littoral rainforest, cassowaries and Mabi forest
  • promote conservation of valued species and ecological communities to prevent them from becoming threatened, e.g. tree kangaroos, lowland rainforest and wet sclerophyll forests.

For more information about threatened species and ecological communities in the Wet Tropics go to the Wet Tropics Management Authority’s website