• natural resource management north queensland
  • Wet Tropics NRM

    Terrain NRM is a community-based not for profit organisation that supports natural resource management (NRM) in the Wet Tropics.

    We build partnerships to secure the health of our natural resources (including water, soil and biodiversity) and provide planning direction, information, advice and practical support to those interested in NRM in our region.

   
Siam Weed (Chromolaena odorata)

Tablelanders are being urged to report infestations of the invasive plant Siam (Chromolaena odorata) after it was discovered just above Tinaroo Dam wall by an expert ecologist.

Terrain NRM Officer Evizel Seymour said that Siam is known to exist in the Herbert and Tully catchments and other coastal areas, but it is very scattered on the Tablelands.  

“This sighting of a lone plant is of great concern, as it hasn’t been found in the Barron Catchment before. We would like to encourage residents and dam users to keep a vigilant look out for this weed and report it if seen”. 

A survey will be undertaken in late June by Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, SunWater, Tableland Regional Council (TRC) and Terrain NRM. Any plants found will have their location recorded and will then be removed to prevent further spread. 

The herbaceous plant has many disguises. When young, it can be mistaken for Blue Top (another common weed, Praxelis clematidea or Ageratum sp.) and when mature it can look like lantana. In open country it will be a dense tangling bush, while in the understory it will scramble up trees like a vine, making it difficult to recognise when not in flower.  

The weed has two main features to look for. The first, are small, distinctive, pale pink flowers in clusters, which can appear white from afar. The second feature is a triangular leaf that is green, soft and hairy, with a three veined “pitchfork” pattern. New leaf growth often shows a purple colouration at the base of the leaf.  

Seeds are very light and easily blown away in the wind so it is best to leave the plant where it is and notify Tableland Regional Council immediately.  

Siam weed is considered one of the world’s most invasive weed, damaging large areas of grazing land and the environment. Locating and eradicating the weed quickly will save the Tableland region from significant expenditure in future weed control and protect our native fauna and grazing lands. 

Siam sightings can be reported to TRC on 1300 362 242. 

Read more information about Siam weed HERE.